Wedding Etiquette Speeches

by Rachelle Von Anders on January 26, 2010

in Wedding Etiquette

wedding speech etiquette

Some of the most touching and genuine moments during a wedding aren’t the carefully organized ceremony, decorations, meal, entertainment and color schemes, but are the more personal times when the bride chokes up giving her vows and when the wedding speeches are given. If you’re reading this article because you have to give a speech at a wedding and everyone’s eyes will be on you, no pressure! We’ve got your wedding etiquette speeches style covered!

Who gives a wedding speech?
This depends entirely on the bride and groom and is considered a deep honor. This will usually include the best man, maid of honor and the couple’s parents. There really is no set order. Sometimes it starts out light with the best man and maid of honor telling their “remember when” stories and concludes with the bride’s father thanking everyone for attending and usually getting a little tear in his eye as he thinks about giving up his baby girl. Other times, the order is reversed, lightening the mood up just in time for the dance floor to open. Again, it’s completely up to the bride and groom. Sometimes, the microphone is then open for anyone else who wants to make a speech, but, you might want to play this by ear on the night if everyone’s been hitting the open bar a little too heavy before the reception. There is no telling what will come out of people’s mouths when they’re nervously standing with a microphone in front of friends and family and have just done five shots of tequila.

What should you include in your wedding speech?
If you’re giving a wedding speech, you should always start off by thanking everyone for attending. Even if everyone who gave a speech ahead of you did the same thing; it’s the polite thing to do. Other than that, the only guideline is to speak from the heart. Don’t try to hard; it won’t come across well. Just be yourself. There is no set time limit. However, do refrain from mentioning any scandal that occurred in the couple’s past. Those who know about it remember; those who don’t do not need to know; and nobody will think it’s funny. Make a rough draft and have someone listen to you read it through (and you don’t have to memorize it). Be sincere and personal (and definitely throw a joke in there if you can; even if the guests give you a pity laugh, it will help you relax during your delivery) and keep it simple. You will do fine!

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